• The 2016 ad from SodaStream recreates the hair-raising walk of shame scene from Game of Thrones, featuring an unsuspecting bottled water buyer.
    The 2016 ad from SodaStream recreates the hair-raising walk of shame scene from Game of Thrones, featuring an unsuspecting bottled water buyer.
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SodaStream has partnered with Clean up Australia in its latest fight against single-use plastic bottle waste in Australia.

The move follows a series of 'shaming' campaigns where it heavily criticised 'big plastic' heavyweights such as Coca-Cola Amatil.
 
SodaStream has also previously petitioned for a national container deposit scheme that would help reduce the 52 billion plastic bottles that end up in landfill or oceans every year.
 
SodaStream Australia managing director Mark Fenton said he was excited to partner with a company “passionate about reducing beverage container rubbish”.
 
Fenton was dismayed by a decision by the NSW Government to award the control of a container deposit scheme to Coca-Cola Amatil, who he said was vehemently opposed to the scheme.

He considers Coca-Cola Amatil a 'big plastic' polluter, in the league of tobacco companies.

SodaStream Australia marketing director Laura Wilson told AdNews the brand thrives off the “David and Goliath style battle” it has had with Coca-Cola and it won’t be backing down over any threats of lawsuits.

SodaStream's 2016 Game of Thrones inspired Shame or Glory campaign generated 50 million online views and over 100,000 shares on social media in 2016.

The latest partnership gives SodaStream an opportunity to collaborate on the national container deposit scheme scheme and support pre-cycling initiatives.
 
According to Clean up Australia data, beverage containers make up 24 per cent of the total rubbish reported by volunteers from Clean up Australia activities.

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