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Kellogg's Australia will be trialling one thousand 100 per cent recyclable displays across retail stores nationwide.

The change to recyclable displays is expected to save around 300 kilos of plastic per year.
The change to recyclable displays is expected to save around 300 kilos of plastic per year.

The new 100 per cent recyclable displays are made with 80 per cent recycled content and a water-based coating instead of plastic coating for the stands, whereas the shelf clips are created with natural materials by combining sugarcane and wood pulp. 

The move is the first trial of the new displays by Kellogg's Australia and is expected to save around 300kgs of plastic per year.

This is part of Kellogg’s commitment to remove unnecessary packaging and plastic, and work towards its goal of 100 per cent recyclable, reusable or compostable packaging by 2025.

The recyclable displays were developed in collaboration with Australian-based point-of-sale supplier ID POP.

ID POP provides unique and sustainable initiatives such as replacing plastic components with both paper alternatives and bioplastics derived from renewable organic materials. Additionally, it has transitioned to using environmentally-friendly water-based coatings instead of plastic-based surface coatings.

“Not only do the displays allow us to remove unnecessary packaging and plastic from our supply chain, but they also help us to decrease our company’s overall impact on the environment,” Ben O’Brien, director of sales at Kellogg's Australia, told PKN.

"As a company, we are always looking for new ways to innovate and improve our business in a manner that is consistent with both our local and global sustainability commitments.

"It is hoped that through this partnership with ID POP, our recyclable displays will save approximately 300kg of plastic from landfill and help us to reach our end goal of 100 per cent recyclable, reusable, or compostable packaging by 2025."

Ben O’Brien, director of sales at Kellogg Australia.
Ben O’Brien, director of sales at Kellogg Australia.

An important part of reducing the company’s waste has been adopting more environmentally-friendly packaging, as well as helping to educate Australian families on how to recycle.

As part of this commitment, it has included the new Australian Recycling Label on packs, which shows that Kellogg’s cereal and snack cartons are all recyclable in kerbside recycling bins.

"At Kellogg, we’re focused on creating Better Days by reducing our environmental impact and increasing our social impact, and our ongoing sustainability efforts have seen us make changes to the way we produce, develop and deliver our products," said O'Brien.

"To achieve this, we committed ourselves to a set of sustainability goals, such as reducing our overall energy consumption and water usage; and introducing 100 per cent recyclable, reusable or compostable packaging by 2025.

"A feat we’re currently on track to reach, with 98 per cent of our Kellogg’s packaging now recyclable – either via kerbside or through REDCycle."

The cereal liners and snack wrappers can be recycled through REDcycle bins at local supermarkets.

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