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Labelling materials manufacturing giant Avery Dennison has teamed up with Ocean Recovery Alliance, founders of Plasticity Forum, entering a three-year agreement to work on plastic pollution as part of the Plasticity Partner Program.

During the three-year period, Avery Dennison and Plasticity aim to collaborate across the industry to discover, connect and facilitate solutions to create innovative prevention programs for plastic pollution.

Roland Simon, vice president of global procurement and corporate sustainability at Avery Dennison said, “Avery Dennison has eight ambitious sustainability goals that we have committed to meet by 2025, and we know that to achieve them we need to work collaboratively within our industry and beyond.

“Partnering with Plasticity enables us to work across our value chain to find systemic solutions to convert plastic waste into valuable second-life resources, which is a key priority for us.”

Doug Woodring, founder and managing director of Ocean Recovery Alliance added: “At Plasticity, we look for practical and progressive thinkers to join our forum, to bring together new ways of thinking, technologies and creativity in order to introduce innovative projects and initiatives that will help improve our ocean environment.

“We are delighted to have Avery Dennison join us as a partner, and we are confident that together we can create significant change.”

To find out more about Plasticity and to reserve space for the forum in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia on October 25, visit plasticityforum.com

 

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