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Jet Technologies has launched a new plastic film for food and beverage labels and laminates, which degrades quickly after disposal.

Made in the same way as traditional plastics, these oxo-degradable films contain an enzyme that makes them break down quickly, becoming food for bacteria and fungi after one to two years.

According to Jack Malki, director at Jet Technologies, the new films are price competitive against options such as cornstarch-based PLA, being only 15 to 20 per cent more expensive than regular plastic grades.

“With landfill being a major issue in Australia and most of the world today, moving away from traditional plastics is becoming an increasingly important focus for many brands.

“We believe oxo-degradable films provide a good alternative in terms of cost and product quality, compared to traditional plastics and other degradable options currently on the market for labels,” he said.

Conventional polymers such as PE, PP and PET can be turned into oxo-degradable versions of label stock and overlaminate gloss or matte finishes, and are compatible with recycling streams containing traditional plastic, added Malki.

“We have so far had a strong response from our clients and end-users, who see this as an excellent and achievable step in the right direction. Our commitment at Jet Technologies is to provide the market with the best film options and technology globally available,” he said.

Food & Drink Business

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