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Innovia Films has launched RayoForm ICU, a crystal clear In-Mould Label film produced using the company's proprietary bubble process.

 

Richard Southward, global product manager, Labels, says: “There is a continued trend towards clear containers. Brand managers favour them because they allow consumers to see the nature, quality and colour of their products before purchase. Clear containers also allow brands to enhance their on-pack branding and offer greater shelf impact.”

According to Innovia Films, RayoForm ICU has been specifically developed to maximise brand impact by the use of clear containers. It also maximises printing and moulding performance and efficiencies.

 

The company says print trials have shown ICU can readily exceed industry standards for sheets per hour. The films’ balanced mechanical properties offer potential SKU reduction as sheets can be sheet-fed in multiple directions. For the moulder, RayoForm ICU offers increased productivity through faster label handling, enhanced container shape retention and more efficient stacking.

Richard Southward adds, “RayoForm ICU is currently available in thickness of 58 micron/230 gauge. We are already seeing a lot of interest in this new product and are happy to provide trial reels to prove its excellent performance.”

 

Innovia Films is major producer of highly differentiated speciality Biaxially Oriented Polypropylene (BOPP) films using a proprietary ‘bubble’ manufacturing process. It holds a leading global position in the markets for high performance coated films, tobacco overwrap, labels and security films. Innovia employs 850 people worldwide and has production sites in Australia, Belgium and the UK. 

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