• Multivac’s R145 system is ideal for smaller food companies producing portion packs.
    Multivac’s R145 system is ideal for smaller food companies producing portion packs.
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At Interpack in May, one of the showcase items for Multivac will be its entry-level R 145 thermoforming packaging machine ideal for SMEs looking at portion pack production.

 

The R 145 comes equipped with an innovative shape and contour cutter to enable smaller food suppliers to produce portion packs for confectionery, jams, salad dressings and sauces cost-effectively and efficiently.

 

Requiring short set-up times, the system offers a high degree of flexibility with regard to the pack design, the format to be produced and the packaging materials used.

 

The cutter produces no trim waste, so reducing packaging costs.

 

It can be applied to all thermoforming packaging machines and its footprint is smaller than with traditional systems.

 

The machine is being shown in conjunction with the the H 052 handling module for converging the packs from the cutting tool. The gripper fixes the portion packs in place during the cutting process, then removes them directly and completely from the cutting unit before feeding them to downstream process equipment. I

 

Integrating the H 052 in the line control ensures that all relevant parameters from upstream processes are reliably transferred to the module.

 

Multivac will be exhibiting at Hall 5 / Stand E23 at Interpack, from 4-10 May in Dusseldorf.

 

 

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