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Jet Technologies has released a new aseptic packaging solution designed to lengthen the lifespan of foods, especially liquids such as fruit puree, dairy, wine, and jams.

The aseptic packaging is a bacteria-free multi-barrier option, which allows the non-refrigerated storage and distribution of food products while retaining long-term product quality in ambient temperatures, according to Daniel Malki, general manager of Jet Technologies.

“Aseptic packaging is a growing market for Australia due to its volume efficiency, lower footprint and high multi-barrier properties for longer asset preservation, which reduces the requirement for preservatives in foods,” says Malki.

The aseptic bags are fully certified and have customisable filling sizes, the company claims, and are available with different spout types to suit individual needs: one-inch spouts for juices, concentrates, pastes and pulp, and two and three-inch spouts for diced food products.

According to Malki, aseptic packaging is a good solution for seasonal products that experience consistent year-round demand.

“This is because it offers an option for products such as fruit to be stored longer and drip fed out onto the production line at regular intervals to meet ongoing demand, rather than needing to be packaged ready for distribution when the ingredients are in season,” he says. “It can also be used for batch storage.”

Jet Technologies will exhibit on stand D100 at AUSPACK 2019, and representatives will be available to speak to customers about its packaging solutions.

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