• The Mecapack FS950 thermoformer.
    The Mecapack FS950 thermoformer.
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Australian-owned company Linco Food Systems will bring equipment from three of its partners to stand B185 at AUSPACK 2019.

The kit on display will include Espera’s Nova weigh price labellers; Mecapack’s FS950 thermoforming machine; and Thurne’s PolySlicer 1000.

Espera’s super Nova

Linco will introduce the Espera Nova series of Industry 4.0-compatible weigh price labellers at AUSPACK.

According to the company, the range re-defines and transforms weigh price labelers into the digitised world of modern production lines and smart functionality and efficiency.

Nova includes popular features from previous Espera weigh price labellers, such as automatic product guidance, automatic printer positioning, tool free conveyor and belt release, and super fast label roll changes, says Linco; it also adds a number of new features that link it up with the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and provide quality-of-life improvements for the user.

These include a 21-inch touch screen that can swipe between start, production, and status screens; an on-board label designer and barcode creator with WYSIWYG display; a 3D camera system for package geometry recognition of natural products; a built-in preventative maintenance assistant; and full online capabilities, including database connectivity and the ability to control remotely via a smartphone or tablet.

Mecapack heats up thermoforming

The Linco stand will also feature the latest pharma industry-designed thermoformer: the Mecapack FS950, which is compatible with flexible and rigid films.

The FS950 is especially adapted to the growing medical devices and pharma products industry and uses a truly ergonomic design for ease of use and quality of packing, claims Linco, which adds that pharma applications require a different level of hygiene, cleanability, visibility, and mostly or fully electric machines with no air.

According to Linco, the unit on display will be set up to produce skin packs in a typical market size format suitable for typical products like red meat, poultry, seafood, dairy and the like.

Features of the FS950 include full washable stainless steel construction and full visibility of machine areas and components; ecological designs with full electric machine versions available; brushless motorised stations for optimum flexibility; electric plug assist forming systems; capacity to integrate coding and marking systems for traceability; and various options for both ergonomics and quality control.

Thurne slices into changeover times

The compact Thurne PolySlicer 1000, which comes with a choice of orbital or involute blade, will be another highlight of Linco’s stand.

Thurne’s PolySlicer 1000 can handle a large variety of products with fast changeover times, according to Linco, and has a large aperture for up to three log slicing capacity, plus quick assisted loading and an easy-to-adjust slicing head.

Its involute blade option can deliver stacks at speeds of up to 1500 revolutions per minute on typically standard, formed products such as luncheon meat, processed ham, and bacon, claims Linco, while the orbital blade can produce finer cuts on products such as pate, salami, natural ham, and soft cheese.

The machine can operate as a standalone unit or as part of an integrated fixed or catch weight system, and is capable of producing a range of pack formats including shingled, stacked, staggered, shaved, portioned, folded or interleaved presentations, as well as variety packs, says Linco.

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