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Australasian drinks company Frucor Suntory has teamed with design agency Denomination for its latest range of premium fruit-infused water, True Water.

Responding to a consumer shift away from carbonated soft drinks, True Water uses real fruit extracts and locally sourced Australian spring water, in which drinks design specialists Denomination developed a look to communicate the brands’ ‘good for you’ image.

The minimal design features photographic images of real fruit at the neck of the glass, Boston shaped bottles, sharing the message of the product’s premium quality as well as its sustainability; encouraging consumers to keep and refill or recycle the bottle.

Denomination CEO Rowena Curlewis said simple designs are often challenging to execute beautifully but the most enjoyable to create.

“Every expression has to be crafted perfectly and there’s nowhere to hide,” she said.

“The packaging communicates the quality of the water inside clearly, creating something that’s photo-ready for those Instagram moments.”

The water droplet logo for True Water is colour dependent on which fruit extract is used and helps distinguish the range of flavours, while maintaining consistency.

“We believe the creation of the drop in the logotype gives True Water the level of desired distinctiveness and ownability without resorting to conventional FMCG cues,” said Curlewis.

The initial launch of True Water will be available in two flavours – raspberry and lime.

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