• The ink gin has the ability to change colour when mixed with tonic, which inspired the design on this variety.
    The ink gin has the ability to change colour when mixed with tonic, which inspired the design on this variety.
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Husk Distillers has given its colour-changing Ink Gin a brand refresh, enrolling the help of MCC for the new labels, which were designed by Zendoke.

Colour changing Ink Gin was the creation of Paul Messenger, founder of Husk Distillers. He said the recipe development was driven by a drive to be completely original and unconventional, using a flower called the Butterfly Pea, which when mixed with tonic would change the pH and the colour of the infused gin to pink.

The distillery said that the swift growth of the gin led to the need to install high-speed label applicators to improve efficiencies in what had been a manual, labour-intensive process. This created the opportunity for a subtle brand refresh to evolve the packaging.

Husk Distilleries enrolled MCC to help with a design refresh for its Ink Gin.
Husk Distilleries enrolled MCC to help with a design refresh for its Ink Gin.

An important component of this refresh was an update to the labels. According to the company, the design of the new labels builds on the concept of the ink bottle as a heritage inkwell, with the torn paper edge and the textured paper. A new front circle label provides the hero branding and features tactile embossing and hot foil that has been colour matched to each varietal. The front strip label provides the varietal details and wraps around three sides of the bottle. It features tactile embossing, and intricate hot foil in the same varietal colours as the circle label. The custom die-cut provides a handcrafted feel to the product. It also features variable batch numbering. A small back label completes the trio.

The Ink Art Gin varietal features limited edition label art by select artists. The back label for this varietal is a double-sided construction, with full graphics on both the front and backside. This has enabled a second design to be shown through the bottle, which when combined with the front labels creates a 3D look through the bottle.

 

 

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