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George Weston Foods has collaborated with Sydney-based visual communications agency Saltmine for the new Bürgen bread packaging and brand design.

‘Nourished living’ led the objective for the new identity and was an important factor for the Bürgen range to emphasise alongside its premium ingredients.

The Bürgen blue colour was enhanced in vibrancy by Saltmine during the redesign to increase the brand’s standout on shelf, as well as a refresh to the logo and imagery used for a modern take on the bread brand.

“The new visual identity created by Saltmine has given Bürgen a new look and feel which will attract new consumers to the brand while building on the elements our loyal consumers already know and love,” said George Weston Foods head of brands and communication Justine Cotter.

“We are confident that the new design and communication refresh will be well received by current and potential consumers alike.”

The blue roundel shape and circular movement of the design were seen as pivotal to maintain the visual equities of the brand as well as a means to “hero the seeds and grains found in every slice of Bürgen”.

“The Bürgen project is a great example of how a strong and consistent visual communication approach across multiple touchpoints can maximise cut-through for a brand,” said Saltmine chief curation officer Sara Salter.

The new look Bürgen range includes six varieties – soy-lin, rye, wholemeal and seeds, pumpkin seeds, and whole grain and oats – and is available in supermarkets nationwide.

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