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Coca-Cola Amatil (CCA) has produced Australia's first carbonated soft drink bottles from 100 per cent recycled plastic, among the first in the world.

By the end of 2019, CCA aims to have all single-serve plastic bottles in Australia switched to the new fully recycled materials; Coke No Sugar is the first product to make the switch.

CCA group managing director Alison Watkins says the switch to 100 per cent recycled materials for carbonated beverages is an Australian first and a credit to the technical team.

“We think every beverage container should be recycled and live again, not become waste in our marine and land environment,” Watkins says.

“But pressure inside a soft drink bottle is up to 100 psi, or three times the pressure in a car tyre. So the bottle for carbonated drinks needs to be much stronger than for still beverages, and that’s been an obstacle in using 100 per cent recycled materials for these types of drinks.

“I’m pleased to say we’ve overcome this challenge through innovation and design, and we’re now the first in Australia to make 100 per cent recycled plastic bottles for carbonated beverages. That’s great news for the sustainability of our products, and a credit to Australian innovation.”

This initiative follows a number of CCA's moves towards sustainability, including the company's use of renewable energies, replacing single-use plastic straws with paper straws and ensuring 100 per cent recycled plastics for Mount Franklin water bottles.

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