• Cadbury’s iconic Dairy Milk, Caramilk and Old Gold family blocks range will now be wrapped in 30% recycled soft plastic packaging. Image: Mondelez International
    Cadbury’s iconic Dairy Milk, Caramilk and Old Gold family blocks range will now be wrapped in 30% recycled soft plastic packaging. Image: Mondelez International
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Cadbury’s iconic Dairy Milk, Caramilk and Old Gold family blocks range will now be wrapped in 30 per cent recycled soft plastic packaging.

In a world-first for Cadbury, the chocolate-maker is supporting emerging advanced recycling technology to source soft plastic packaging that contains recycled content.

This move is supported by flexible packaging supplier Amcor, who is producing the new packaging across the Cadbury Dairy Milk, Caramilk and Old Gold family blocks.

Traditionally, a single-use material for food grade packaging, the switch to sourcing recycled plastics will see more than 120 tonnes of packaging waste diverted from landfill. 

While the new packaging is more sustainable, it looks and feels the same, carrying Cadbury’s iconic purple colours and distinctive markers and preserving the chocolate’s taste, texture and shape.

The pack sports a new on-pack QR code, leading Cadbury fans to more information on the packaging innovation, and how Cadbury is supporting a circular economy for packaging. 

Visiting Australia for the first time in four years, Dirk Van de Put, CEO of Mondelez International, brand owner of Cadbury, said the country was leading the way in finding solutions for a circular economy for packaging waste. 

“Until recently, soft plastic packaging has been considered a single-use material,” Van de Put said.

“The development of advanced recycling technology and our significant investment in recycled soft plastic means it’s now possible for Cadbury fans to enjoy their favourite treats more sustainably here in Australia.

“Today marks a significant step in our journey, saving 120 tonnes of plastic from going to landfill. Most excitingly, this is just the beginning of our journey to use more recycled plastic in our packaging.

“We started this process by targeting our larger packaging sizes to maximise our impact, but we’re committed to using more recycled plastic in our packaging in the coming years, as access and availability of advanced recycling technology increases.”

This latest development sends a strong signal that there is demand for recycled soft plastic packaging produced locally in Australia.

“Soft plastic packaging plays an important role – it keeps food fresh, reduces food waste, and helps keep products safe. However, Australia currently lacks the ability to recycle soft plastic packaging back into food-safe packaging,” explained Tanya Barden, CEO of the Australian Food and Grocery Council (AFGC). 

“Through the AFGC, food and grocery manufacturers are taking the lead in helping to create a circular economy for soft plastics here in Australia.

“The move by Cadbury to use recycled content in their soft plastic packaging demonstrates that demand exists for this material in Australia. This will help give confidence to the recycling and packaging supply chain to invest in Australian advanced recycling facilities that can process this material.“ 

This milestone coincides with the anniversary of Cadbury’s 100 years of Australian manufacturing. 

The first Cadbury family blocks to include recycled soft plastic in their packaging are being delivered to major retailers and supermarkets across Australia this week.

In a world-first for Cadbury, it is supporting emerging advanced recycling technology to source soft plastic packaging that contains recycled content. Image: Mondelez International
In a world-first for Cadbury, it is supporting emerging advanced recycling technology to source soft plastic packaging that contains recycled content. Image: Mondelez International

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