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Disruptive technologies are helping leading manufacturers to boost productivity, attract and engage new consumers, inspire new market strategies and drive substantial business growth. Here's our pick of disruptive technologies to watch:

Drones: Deutsche Post, the world's biggest courier company, is using a drone to deliver medication to a remote German island. It’s been such a success the company is considering using the “parcelcopter” to make more regular deliveries.

‘Mobile-geddon’: mobile devices are making waves in the business world: think service delivery, worker productivity and customer experience.

Distributed manufacturing: is where the final product is manufactured near the final customer, so the raw materials, assembly and product fabrication are decentralised, potentially increasing customisation.

Advanced robotics: including human-machine collaboration.

Emergent Artificial Intelligence: is where machines can learn automatically by taking on large volumes of information; it has huge implications for productivity.

Self-driving vehicles: that could potentially move or distribute goods.

Internet of Things: has massive potential for business process optimisation, reduced downtime and waste, and increased quality overall.

Find out more about these disruptive technologies by reading the full story here.

Food & Drink Business

Wide Open Agriculture (WOA) will supply up to 60 per cent of its high-value, plant-based protein concentrate to Monde Nissin Australia as construction begins on the company’s pilot production facility.

A trailblazer of private label manufacturing, Steric is still an industry leader while also creating its own branded products. Editor Kim Berry spoke to CEO Richard Brownie.

Traditional Indonesian remedies called jamu inspired Sophie Todd to make her own. Kim Berry finds out how a kitchen experiment turned into Mrs Toddy’s Tonics, now available nationwide.