• Showing size really does matter, the smaller Pringles cans will reduce 37,000 kgs of packaging per year in the ANZ region, while maintaining the same amount of Pringles chips per can.
    Showing size really does matter, the smaller Pringles cans will reduce 37,000 kgs of packaging per year in the ANZ region, while maintaining the same amount of Pringles chips per can.
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Snack brand Pringles, owned by Kellanova, has set out to minimise its environmental impact by reducing the can height of its 53g varieties, which will take 37,000kgs of packaging out of the system every year in Australia and New Zealand, while still delivering the same amount of chips.

The trimmed package now features less empty space with the height being reduced by about 10 per cent.

“Pringles has a distinctive and iconic can, and we’re committed to maintaining quality while continuing to find ways to minimise our environmental footprint,” said Dan Bitti, head of Salty Snacks at Kellanova, the manufacturer of Pringles.

“We’re excited to introduce revamped cans delivering the same snack with less packaging.”

On top of the reduced can size, as part of Pringles’ ongoing efforts to improve sustainability, the plastic lid was also removed from the 53g can back in 2022.

Kellanova is working towards developing more sustainable packaging across the Pringles range.

The smaller Pringles 53g variety is now available in all major supermarkets.

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