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Splatt Engineering partnered with a labelling technology company in Italy to build its own labeller for the Australian beverage market.

Splatt has been working with Italy’s PMR Labellers for 10 years, but wanted to be able to import and assemble the components of a small, professional and economical labeller for smaller beverage companies such as craft brewers.

The company has now launched the Splatt PMR Labeller in SP-40 and SP-60 models for this purpose, offering front and/or full wrap labels, speeds of up to 3500 bottles or cans per hour, and a label speed of up to 40 or 60 metres a minute.

There is also a belt-driven roll wall, variable speed drives, an infeed spacer, and optional conveyors.

Splatt Engineering CEO Rob Splatt says the labeller is small compared to others.

“The bulk of the market is now in the smaller beverage space – craft beer, niche premium drinks, and so on,” he says.

“These producers need the flexibility to run bottles and cans with a full wrap label on a can in order to change the beer type, for example.”

Splatt says there’s a growing trend in wrap labels due to the flexibility they offer craft beer companies in particular.

“They can overlay another label that they’ve done using this machine if they want,” he says.

“We’re getting lots of traction in the market as we can tailor-make the conveyor, or add it to an existing conveying system.

Splatt Engineering offers a wide range of can-filling and beer bottle-filling solutions which can fill up to 80,000 cans per hour, catering to larger beverage producers as well as small.

“Whether you need 800 bottles an hour filled – or 80,000 cans, we’ve got the right solution,” Splatt says.

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